https://journal.computermusic.org.au/chroma/issue/feed Chroma: Journal of the Australasian Computer Music Association 2022-07-14T00:00:00+00:00 Charles Martin charles.martin@anu.edu.au Open Journal Systems <p><em>Chroma</em> is the Journal of the Australasian Computer Music Association. This publication provides a forum for new compositions, information sharing, and research about music technology and computer music, principally throughout Australia and New Zealand.</p> <p>From 1989-2006, <em>Chroma</em> was the newsletter of the Australasian Computer Music Association. The publication was relaunched in 2021 as a fully peer-reviewed and open accesss journal to accompany the annual Australasian Computer Music Conference (ACMC).</p> https://journal.computermusic.org.au/chroma/article/view/3 Composing with Emergent Instruments in Habitats 2022-02-02T02:15:19+00:00 Michael Lukaszuk michael.paul.lukaszuk@gmail.com <div> <div><em>Habitats</em> (2021) is a multi-movement computer music composition by Michael Lukaszuk. Each movement consists of a dedicated algorithmic composition program that explores digital lutherie with extended versions of physical models from the Synthesis Toolkit and custom-built instruments whose bodies change over time. This article describes the manner in which resources from the ChucK programming language are used to shape these instruments, and how aspects of the design and composition of <em>Habitats</em> are informed by prominent conceptual frameworks used in the cultural studies field. With regards to digital lutherie, this article addresses how I sought to convey a sense of instrumentality using simulated bodies that are projected through use within a particular ChucK program, instead of actual physical instruments. The code and resultant audio for this piece are research-creation efforts that respond to our everchanging definition of composition. In linking my computer music practice and scholarly background in cultural studies, this article also aims to highlight how creative coding represents participation in the formation of culture. <em>Habitats</em> can be heard in full using the following link: <a href="https://journal.computermusic.org.au/chroma/workflow/index/3/*Habitats*%20(2021) is a multi-movement computer music composition by Michael Lukaszuk. Each movement consists of a dedicated algorithmic composition program that explores digital lutherie with extended versions of physical models from the Synthesis Toolkit and custom-built instruments whose bodies change over time. This article describes the manner in which resources from the ChucK programming language are used to shape these instruments, and how aspects of the design and composition of *Habitats* are informed by prominent conceptual frameworks used in the cultural studies field. With regards to digital lutherie, this article addresses how I sought to convey a sense of instrumentality using simulated bodies that are projected through use within a particular ChucK program, instead of actual physical instruments. The code and resultant audio for this piece are research-creation efforts that respond to our everchanging definition of composition. In linking my computer music practice and scholarly background in cultural studies, this article also aims to highlight how creative coding represents participation in the formation of culture. *Habitats* can be heard in full using the following link: &lt;https:/michaellukaszuk.bandcamp.com/album/habitats&gt;. Code examples can be found using: &lt;https:/www.michaellukaszuk.com/research&gt;.">https://michaellukaszuk.bandcamp.com/album/habitats</a>. Code examples can be found using: <a href="https://www.michaellukaszuk.com/research">https://www.michaellukaszuk.com/research</a>.</div> </div> 2022-07-17T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Michael Lukaszuk https://journal.computermusic.org.au/chroma/article/view/7 Exploring aspects of place through sound mapping 2022-02-02T02:07:59+00:00 Sze Tsang netizenette@gmail.com <p>Combining aural and visual elements of a place can be a powerful way of exploring the intersections of time, history and geographical features that exist within a location. One way of combining these elements is through sound mapping and cartophony, where spatial and physical information is used as a way of representing an individual's surroundings and realities of a place, and particularly highlighting personal associations, emotions and memories. This paper details the author's processes in incorporating place into compositional practice through a combination of field recordings and sonification, in relation to the author's work, <em>The Lost</em> (2021) - an audio-visual contemplation of the sensation of loss and the subsequent feelings of dislocation, and how these feelings related to the artist's own life experiences at the time. <em>The Lost</em> is a work partly based on a map of Perth from 1838, detailing many of Perth's now-lost wetlands. This map was then sonified using Iannix (a graphical sequencer), and the sounds were processed and combined in Ableton Live (a Digital Audio Workstation) with a field recording from the still-existing Herdman's Lake and sonified longitudinal and latitude values of these lost wetlands. <em>The Lost</em> is an exploration of connections between artist, history and place, and how these aspects can inform the creation of a work. Through this practice, the author aims to explore how sound and visual elements can combine and resonate with the other, and how such a practice can highlight the connections between artist and place.</p> 2022-08-22T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Sze Tsang https://journal.computermusic.org.au/chroma/article/view/11 The Multichannel Monophonic Simulation Tool 2022-02-02T02:13:41+00:00 Jesse Austin-Stewart jhjaustin@gmail.com Bridget Johnson B.D.Johnson@massey.ac.nz <div> <div>Composing works for novel multichannel systems has various limitations. Spatial audio predominantly relies on the use of stereophonic spatial methods that privilege the sweet spot listening position. The sweet spot requires accurate positioning of loudspeakers in order to realize an unbroken phantom image so that listeners can perceive an accurate spatial picture. Beyond the technical, there are also a number of social and hearing related issues associated with the sweet spot. Because of these issues, previous work has been done to establish a compositional framework, entitled the <em>Multichannel Monophonic Compositional Framework</em>, to give composers methods to create non-sweet spot oriented spatial music. The results from test cases of this framework show that the framework is successful, though the composer feedback expressed difficulty in creating non-sweet spot music for a novel loudspeaker array when not given the opportunity to both work with the loudspeaker array and the space in which the loudspeaker array would be situated. The <em>Multichannel Monophonic Simulation Tool</em> is designed to address the issues of composers being unable to accurately simulate novel 2D loudspeaker arrays and the acoustic space that they are within. This article will break down the tool’s context and use cases.</div> </div> 2022-07-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Jesse Austin-Stewart, Bridget Johnson https://journal.computermusic.org.au/chroma/article/view/9 Professional Views of Digital Audio Workstations and Collaborative Audio Mixing 2021-12-17T03:52:39+00:00 Scott Stickland scott.stickland@uon.edu.au Rukshan Athauda rukshan.athauda@newcastle.edu.au Nathan Scott nathan.scott@newcastle.edu.au <div> <div>Digital audio workstations (DAWs) play a critical role in audio mixing and post-production activities, facilitating audio engineers and clients to work collaboratively in a studio environment. The coronavirus pandemic brought into focus the need to carry out these activities in an effective manner with remote participants. This article explores the requirements for an optimal remote collaboration platform to facilitate post-production audio mixing through a qualitative study. We interviewed a group of Australian-based professional music/sound practitioners about their use of DAWs, work-case scenarios, use of remote control and collaboration features, and perspectives for an "ideal" remote collaborative music post-production environment. We derived several insights from the analysis of this data that can inform the design and development of a new collaboration platform. The evidence showed that the most common practice for remote mixing collaboration is an iterative process of sharing audio files/recordings with audio engineers who perform mixing/post-production work, which is shared back with clients for feedback asynchronously. Professional audio mixing practitioners do not typically engage in real-time remote collaboration outside of remote one-to-one sound source recording because synchronous post-production collaboration methods are unavailable. Our analysis derives a vision for such a platform: a "virtual" remote collaboration environment that emulates an in-studio experience.</div> </div> 2022-07-14T00:00:00+00:00 Copyright (c) 2022 Scott Stickland, Rukshan Athauda, Nathan Scott